When Worlds Collide

February 26, 2009
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This week’s guest blog post comes to use from David Handelsman, Life Sciences Business Solutions Manager at SAS.  You can read more about David here.

In just the past week, we’ve seen two fascinating examples of improbable collisions.  In orbit, two satellites unintentionally smashed into each other at high speed.  While the probability of this occurring can certainly be calculated by NASA, that probability has to be quite low considering we’re talking about a 4-dimenional collision (x,y and z-planes, along with time), at very high speeds.  If you could imagine hitting one bullet with another, and doing it blindfolded, you’d have an idea how unlikely this collision would be.

Continue reading “When Worlds Collide”



This week’s guest blog post comes to use from David Handelsman, Life Sciences Business Solutions Manager at SAS.  You can read more about David here.

In just the past week, we’ve seen two fascinating examples of improbable collisions.  In orbit, two satellites unintentionally smashed into each other at high speed.  While the probability of this occurring can certainly be calculated by NASA, that probability has to be quite low considering we’re talking about a 4-dimenional collision (x,y and z-planes, along with time), at very high speeds.  If you could imagine hitting one bullet with another, and doing it blindfolded, you’d have an idea how unlikely this collision would be.

Continue reading “When Worlds Collide”


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