Three Seconds

June 16, 2009
51 Views

Three to five seconds – that’s the amount of time the average reader of your email campaign spends looking at your message. Notice we said reader, not recipient… for these precious seconds you’ve had to have made it to their inbox and earned an open. Seems pretty daunting doesn’t it? Imagine what has to be done to get a conversion…

To make the most of your brief time on stage, make sure your message is clear. Make sure that the recipient knows what is expected of them so that your message isn’t simply being deleted and your chances aren’t ruined the next time.

The Art of Mono-Tasking
The multi-tasking, multi-channel world is the reason for these brief seconds of glory… don’t fall victim yourself, practice the art of mono-tasking, The Dumb Little Man Blog tells you how.

You can apply this practice to your campaigns, review each critically – switch of all distractions, minimize interruptions and set a timer (maybe 15 minutes.) Evaluate the engagement earned – how many opens, clicks and conversions were earned? Focus as narrowly as possible, measure over similar campaigns sent last week, month etc. What made one campaign more successful than another?

Make notes how you can improve your


Three to five seconds – that’s the amount of time the average reader of your email campaign spends looking at your message. Notice we said reader, not recipient… for these precious seconds you’ve had to have made it to their inbox and earned an open. Seems pretty daunting doesn’t it? Imagine what has to be done to get a conversion…

To make the most of your brief time on stage, make sure your message is clear. Make sure that the recipient knows what is expected of them so that your message isn’t simply being deleted and your chances aren’t ruined the next time.

The Art of Mono-Tasking
The multi-tasking, multi-channel world is the reason for these brief seconds of glory… don’t fall victim yourself, practice the art of mono-tasking, The Dumb Little Man Blog tells you how.

You can apply this practice to your campaigns, review each critically – switch of all distractions, minimize interruptions and set a timer (maybe 15 minutes.) Evaluate the engagement earned – how many opens, clicks and conversions were earned? Focus as narrowly as possible, measure over similar campaigns sent last week, month etc. What made one campaign more successful than another?

Make notes how you can improve your future campaigns, prioritize these changes and use the metrics you’ve earned to strengthen engagement. Gather feedback from others – each week print out a couple copies of your campaigns and randomly ask people in your group/ company to give feedback on ways to improve. Select people at random, choosing new guinea pigs each week; acknowledge their feedback and incorporate the ideas you can – your campaigns will strengthen and your ideas for new campaigns will grow.

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