Organizational change remains notoriously elusive

December 1, 2009
48 Views

The Harvard Business Review (HBR) weekly poll cites John Kotter’s definitive work on leading change featured in the well known HBR article, Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail.

“Although Kotter’s advice for leading change is well-known, successful organizational change is still notoriously elusive.”

I have written before about the missing results from the field of change management and how change leaders are saddled by surface level change management best practices. This is why I write about why change management needs a big dose of design thinking — a problem solving methodology to design successful change.

Change is filled with challenges, problems, the unanticipated. Leading change without a problem solving methodology is similar to getting your car stuck in the snow without a shovel. No problem solving tools, no shovel, and you’re stuck. If there’s any blip in your plan, which there will be, you have a problem to solve. Change management training that doesn’t  teach you how to solve problems is… well, failing to give you shovel when you get stuck.

I welcome your thoughts. Do you use a problem solving methodology along with your change management



The Harvard Business Review (HBR) weekly poll cites John Kotter’s definitive work on leading change featured in the well known HBR article, Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail.

“Although Kotter’s advice for leading change is well-known, successful organizational change is still notoriously elusive.”

I have written before about the missing results from the field of change management and how change leaders are saddled by surface level change management best practices. This is why I write about why change management needs a big dose of design thinking — a problem solving methodology to design successful change.

Change is filled with challenges, problems, the unanticipated. Leading change without a problem solving methodology is similar to getting your car stuck in the snow without a shovel. No problem solving tools, no shovel, and you’re stuck. If there’s any blip in your plan, which there will be, you have a problem to solve. Change management training that doesn’t  teach you how to solve problems is… well, failing to give you shovel when you get stuck.

I welcome your thoughts. Do you use a problem solving methodology along with your change management methodology?

kotter-change-management

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