What IBM’s Recent $3M Investment in IoT Means for You and Me

December 4, 2015
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Recently, IBM—the technology powerhouse—announced to the public that it will be making a brand new “Internet of Things” product. They plan to pour over $3 billion into the project over a four year period. The core idea of this “Internet of Things” is to create a network of data in virtually everything to improve operational efficiency.

Recently, IBM—the technology powerhouse—announced to the public that it will be making a brand new “Internet of Things” product. They plan to pour over $3 billion into the project over a four year period. The core idea of this “Internet of Things” is to create a network of data in virtually everything to improve operational efficiency.

Initially, IBM will put more than $1 billion into the device in order kickstart the effort and it plans to task many of its existing employees and technologies with building it. This seems to be the theme of IBM’s approach to emerging tech—throwing everything they have at it until they’ve reached a marketable solution.

But what does this new “Internet of Things” mean for ordinary citizens? Will we soon be sending text messages via our kitchen appliances and seeing mobile learning reach a point that perhaps that we haven’t even considered? Here’s what IBM’s investment in IoT means for you and me:

1. More Integration

With the advent of an interconnected medium for all of our devices, we will experience cross-platform integration and communication. Think about areas like leadership skill training or learning and big data, now think about the implications of these two seemingly separate topics are integrated, Your refrigerator might talk with your thermostat to know how to adjust its temperature settings, for example.

2. More Work

Feel overworked as it is? With the IoT, roles such as virtual assistants are becoming more and more popular, leading to a 24/7 global commerce phenomenon. Work might creep into more of our time, even while we are supposed to be sleeping or resting.

3. More Efficiency

The availability of large data sets will lend itself to creating more efficient technologies and systems. For instance, take the new Windows 10 update hitting users and companies in August. It’s new applications, such as the brand new web browser, Microsoft Edge, will be more efficient with web searches for its users. In addition, this could be a great thing for greener energy moving forward. The automobile industry would stand to benefit, meaning potential discounts for everyday car drivers.

4. Less Privacy

If devices of every kind begin to transmit data about our location, it could lead to more cyber spying by governments and corporations. Of course, it could also be dangerous for younger generations who aren’t aware of online threats.

5. More Security

Even with potential privacy concerns, it would seem that home digital security would be improved drastically by the IoT. The ability for different security devices to communicate with each other could provide more coverage around your home. Take a step outside your home and into your business. Consider your investment on your company’s payroll software, protected passwords and other sensitive data.

While some of these realities may seem far off, it is very possible that in the near future we will experience a paradigm shift in the way we connect and communicate with each other. In fact, IBM has already partnered with a B2B team within The Weather Company to bring sensors to drones, smartphones, and aircraft of all kind.

IBM has said publicly that partnerships are the core of their plan to remain on the forefront of the technological revolution. In fact, a big move to the cloud is in the works for IBM, meaning their data will be safe from potential foreign cyber attacks as well as providing unique analytics opportunities.