How Each Game of Thrones House Would Approach Corporate IT [INFOGRAPHIC]

April 23, 2015
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Are you a Game of Thrones fan? If so, you understand the all-encompassing fandom and how absolutely everything can be related to Game of Thrones. We feel the same way- and that’s why Adeptia decided to imagine how each Game of Thrones house would approach corporate IT.

Are you a Game of Thrones fan? If so, you understand the all-encompassing fandom and how absolutely everything can be related to Game of Thrones. We feel the same way- and that’s why Adeptia decided to imagine how each Game of Thrones house would approach corporate IT.

The House of Stark, for example, would practice risk-averse IT; they know that winter is coming, and planning for the worst by beefing up disaster recovery, security, and business continuity capabilities is just a smart strategy. Meanwhile, the House of Greyjoy would practice bootstrap IT; instead of investing for the long-term, the Greyjoys have few resources and have to start from a zero-budget basis, fighting fires as they spring up.

House Arryn sits comfortably inside the Eyrie, staying aloof from kingdom politics in a manner similar to ivory tower IT. CIOs from House Arryn would remove themselves from the C-suite fray, preferring to just keep the infrastructure going in a classic “server-hugging” manner. House Tully, the duty-bound clan that emphasizes family, duty, and honor, would clearly lean towards compliant IT, following the rules in order to play it safe. The Targaryen House and their dragons are skilled in conquering by force, meaning that a Targaryen CIO would practice a similar “slash-and-burn” technique when facing IT problems. The Targaryen CIO would rip out infrastructure, perform forklift upgrades, and start from scratch.

The Lannisters have a large budget and can spend their way out of any IT problems, while the House of Baratheon would want to maintain control of everything from infrastructure and applications to data in their brand of “control freak” IT. House Tyrell, meanwhile, is famous for making smart alliances, meaning that CIOs from Tyrell would be nimble enough to meet their users’ requirements while moving the business forward faster in adaptable IT. Finally, the House Martell is staunchly independent; they know how to keep their budgets in line, and they would understand how to keep the line of business from crossing into IT’s domain. Which approach resonates the most with you?