Dave Wells’ prescription for the incurious

May 4, 2009
58 Views

Former TDWI education director Dave Wells keeps running into users whose BI reports might as well be printed. These users simply accept the data as presented and don’t ask questions. That’s nothing new, of course. The difference is that Dave has a way to deal with it.

I caught part of his session today at TDWI World Conference in Chicago: “Understanding Cause and Effect: An Introduction to Systems Thinking.”

For the incurious, Dave prescribes causal-loop diagrams. When he starts drawing, and people can visualize a complex system — especially when they work inside it — they quickly get involved with the analysis. Once involved, they can’t avoid asking questions.

Take the case of the healthcare insurer, for example. His simple lines and arrows demonstrate how badly thought out incentives for data entry clerks actually increases the rate of bad data entering the system.

Available systems-diagramming tools, however, just aren’t good enough yet to do all he needs to do, he says. He showed one, MapSys, that comes closest.

He’s going to go looking. Over the next six to nine months, he’s going to be “that pain-in-the-ass guy from BI” attending every systems-thinking conference he can.

Link to o

Former TDWI education director Dave Wells keeps running into users whose BI reports might as well be printed. These users simply accept the data as presented and don’t ask questions. That’s nothing new, of course. The difference is that Dave has a way to deal with it.

I caught part of his session today at TDWI World Conference in Chicago: “Understanding Cause and Effect: An Introduction to Systems Thinking.”

For the incurious, Dave prescribes causal-loop diagrams. When he starts drawing, and people can visualize a complex system — especially when they work inside it — they quickly get involved with the analysis. Once involved, they can’t avoid asking questions.

Take the case of the healthcare insurer, for example. His simple lines and arrows demonstrate how badly thought out incentives for data entry clerks actually increases the rate of bad data entering the system.

Available systems-diagramming tools, however, just aren’t good enough yet to do all he needs to do, he says. He showed one, MapSys, that comes closest.

He’s going to go looking. Over the next six to nine months, he’s going to be “that pain-in-the-ass guy from BI” attending every systems-thinking conference he can.

Link to original post

You may be interested

Big Data Revolution in Agriculture Industry: Opportunities and Challenges
Analytics
25 views
Analytics
25 views

Big Data Revolution in Agriculture Industry: Opportunities and Challenges

Kayla Matthews - July 24, 2017

Big data is all about efficiency. There are many types of data available, and many ways to use that information.…

How SAP Hana is Driving Big Data Startups
Big Data
298 shares3,195 views
Big Data
298 shares3,195 views

How SAP Hana is Driving Big Data Startups

Ryan Kh - July 20, 2017

The first version of SAP Hana was released in 2010, before Hadoop and other big data extraction tools were introduced.…

Data Erasing Software vs Physical Destruction: Sustainable Way of Data Deletion
Data Management
154 views
Data Management
154 views

Data Erasing Software vs Physical Destruction: Sustainable Way of Data Deletion

Manish Bhickta - July 20, 2017

Physical Data destruction techniques are efficient enough to destroy data, but they can never be considered eco-friendly. On the other…