When graphs, piecharts and all else fails… Dilbert to the rescue!

April 22, 2009
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If you work in a Marketing or Sales department then you probably have the challenging task of convincing your less technical colleagues of the benefit of using your awesome customer insights.

I’m quite proud of the social network analysis (SNA) that I’d first completed months ago. It is refreshed each month (the data warehouse load is too high to run it daily or weekly as I would like). I’ve been tracking its performance, and am continually surprised.

The trouble is that my colleagues are having trouble understanding how they can use it to formalise customer communications, so I decided to try a different approach than graphs and piecharts etc.

Instead I thought I might try something humorous, hence Dilbert to the rescue! I have created a dozen or so custom Dilbert slides that provides some info about a customer insight made available by the SNA and also has a humorous conclusion to those insights. I’ll pass this around the department in a series of daily emails.

Here is one example (I had to change the project nickname to “SNA” for this blog);


If you work in a Marketing or Sales department then you probably have the challenging task of convincing your less technical colleagues of the benefit of using your awesome customer insights.

I’m quite proud of the social network analysis (SNA) that I’d first completed months ago. It is refreshed each month (the data warehouse load is too high to run it daily or weekly as I would like). I’ve been tracking its performance, and am continually surprised.

The trouble is that my colleagues are having trouble understanding how they can use it to formalise customer communications, so I decided to try a different approach than graphs and piecharts etc.

Instead I thought I might try something humorous, hence Dilbert to the rescue! I have created a dozen or so custom Dilbert slides that provides some info about a customer insight made available by the SNA and also has a humorous conclusion to those insights. I’ll pass this around the department in a series of daily emails.

Here is one example (I had to change the project nickname to “SNA” for this blog);

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