The rest of the story…

February 4, 2009
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Yesterday’s post talked about piquing your reader’s interest by offering them a little information up front and then coaxing them into another channel. The title of today’s post is a mini-ode to Paul Harvey the original for offering a little nugget of information that built up to the rest of the story…

Here’s remainder of our story, in the form of a few examples that you can draw from:
A flour company lists a recipe on a small bag of flour; they also list a second, partial recipe with a web address taking buyers to their blog. To learn more, users visit the site. The company doesn’t sell on the blog, they simply engage – so well that after a few interactions the user becomes an online customer.

My bank leaves me a voicemail, a quick update of how the market did that day. They also offer general advice for the days ahead; this voicemail is a reminder to visit my online banking profile (and it works.)

A gardening company offers tips in their printed mailing – an article listing 10 tips to build a victory garden, but the article only includes seven of the ten with a reminder that the other three will be included in next week’s email. It makes me look for their message.

Your Offer Follows


Yesterday’s post talked about piquing your reader’s interest by offering them a little information up front and then coaxing them into another channel. The title of today’s post is a mini-ode to Paul Harvey the original for offering a little nugget of information that built up to the rest of the story…

Here’s remainder of our story, in the form of a few examples that you can draw from:
A flour company lists a recipe on a small bag of flour; they also list a second, partial recipe with a web address taking buyers to their blog. To learn more, users visit the site. The company doesn’t sell on the blog, they simply engage – so well that after a few interactions the user becomes an online customer.

My bank leaves me a voicemail, a quick update of how the market did that day. They also offer general advice for the days ahead; this voicemail is a reminder to visit my online banking profile (and it works.)

A gardening company offers tips in their printed mailing – an article listing 10 tips to build a victory garden, but the article only includes seven of the ten with a reminder that the other three will be included in next week’s email. It makes me look for their message.

Your Offer Follows Later is the subject line employed by a travel company; they sent an email survey to their customer base. Recipients who took the survey received custom trip coupons in the print piece that followed, it was a non-traditional way to engage the recipient and deliver exactly what they wanted.

Remember, multi-channel doesn’t have to lead with email or always include a web component; mix things up to foster engagement and make multi-channel work.
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