What Does Your TV Say About You and Your Voting Intentions?

September 3, 2015
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You are more than what you eat! You’re also what you wear, what you drive, and what you watch on TV.

You are more than what you eat! You’re also what you wear, what you drive, and what you watch on TV. With that in mind, we asked more than 2000 people to tell us what television stations they watched as well as how likely they would be to vote for a number of candidates for president of the USA.

Right now, several candidates are making regular news headlines so we’ll focus our attention on Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Donald Trump.

In terms of basic TV channels known for news reporting, people who indicated they were more likely to vote for Hillary Clinton were also more likely to frequently watch NBC, CBS, ABC, and less likely to watch Fox. On the other hand, people who were more likely to vote for Donald Trump were more likely to watch Fox and less likely to watch CNN. Likely Bernie Sanders voters were more likely to watch NBC and CNN, and less likely to watch Fox.

TV_President_Election

 

In terms of specialty channels and networks, people more likely to vote for Bernie Sanders were more likely to watch ESPN (sports), HBO (movies), and Disney (family). Donald Trump voters were more likely to frequently watch HSN (shopping), Discovery (reality TV), MTV (music), and TBS (comedy). Hillary Clinton voters were neither more nor less likely to watch these specialty channels.

Can you put together a picture in your mind of the types of people who are more likely to vote for each of these candidates? Can you see yourself in these voter profiles? You are what you watch indeed!

N=2200 census representative adults residing in the USA, January 1 to July 31 2015. Respondents for this survey were randomly selected according to US census demographics from among those who have volunteered to answer surveys as part of the Peanut Labs self-serve pre-screened panel. The data was weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the USA. Because the sample was based on those who self-selected for participation rather than a sample based on probabilities, estimates of sampling error cannot be calculated. All sample surveys and polls are subject to multiple sources of error including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, and measurement error.