Recently Read 02/10/2010

February 15, 2010
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A few highlights from the blogosphere this week:

The Relational Database

This is an interesting–if long–post on the future of the relational database. I found this line particularly provocative:

Bugs in a properly designed relational database usually don’t lead to data integrity issues; bugs in a key/value database, however, quite easily lead to data integrity issues.

Simon Says

The data integrity issue might be a deal breaker for many organizations thinking of moving to a cloud-based application.

I completely agree that Enterprise 2.0 apps offer amazing promise. Further, the rise of unstructured data may well mean that traditional data models might not be able to handle increased demands–both in terms of quantity of data and data types. I’d argue that data mining and other BI-type activities are all fine and dandy, but will most CIOs embrace applications with completely different data models that can compromise data integrity? Will they do this when data integrity is already a challenge in most organizations? I have my doubts for now.

Social Karma, Part 5

Jim Harris’ latest installment in his series is rife with key social media insights

A few highlights from the blogosphere this week:

The Relational Database

This is an interesting–if long–post on the future of the relational database. I found this line particularly provocative:

Bugs in a properly designed relational database usually don’t lead to data integrity issues; bugs in a key/value database, however, quite easily lead to data integrity issues.

Simon Says

The data integrity issue might be a deal breaker for many organizations thinking of moving to a cloud-based application.

I completely agree that Enterprise 2.0 apps offer amazing promise. Further, the rise of unstructured data may well mean that traditional data models might not be able to handle increased demands–both in terms of quantity of data and data types. I’d argue that data mining and other BI-type activities are all fine and dandy, but will most CIOs embrace applications with completely different data models that can compromise data integrity? Will they do this when data integrity is already a challenge in most organizations? I have my doubts for now.

Social Karma, Part 5

Jim Harris’ latest installment in his series is rife with key social media insights. Jim delineates between on-site and off-site engagement. While most people know the former, the latter involves

  • Promote the content of others far more often than you promote your own content
  • If you use Twitter, then re-tweet more than you tweet (Note: a future part in this series will discuss Twitter in detail)
  • Leave meaningful comments on other blogs—and only include a link to one of your blog posts if it is truly relevant
  • Try to respond as promptly to a message left on one of your outposts as you would to a comment left on your blog
  • If you blog about conversations that originated on one of your outposts, then properly attribute the others involved

Simon Says

This is the best one in the series so far. Really good stuff. So many people focus on building a presence on their sites but less on building a presence on others. As I point out in the comments, however, there’s only so much time in a day. It’s hard to manage what others are saying about you; you can’t engage in every conversation.

IT Project Myths

In The Myth about a Myth, Henrik Liliendahl Sørensen explores the myth about IT projects being all about the technology. The post itself is short but the comments are really insightful.

Simon Says

Many of the opinions expressed in the comments echo the same sentiment: technology cannot be viewed in isolation. People, data, business processes, politics, and other “non-techie” factors play just as much–if not greater roles–in the success of IT projects. I’d also argue that this holds true for projects of all types: MDM, ERP, CRM, etc.

The Virtual Company

In “For Telecommuters, It’s Not About Going To Work“, Adam Hochberg of NPR tells the story of Fuentek, a completely virtual company. Everyone works at home. Always. All 40 employees.

Simon Says

I am very curious about Fuentek’s use of collaboration software and other wiki-type tools. I don’t see how this company can operate exclusively on email and shared drives. Stay tuned. I’m going to try and do a podcast with someone from Fuentek.