Left Behind

March 12, 2009
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We’ve blogged in the past about the importance of data security… and like most, I typically think this is a straight-forward concept – one person protecting THEIR PC, mobile etc. That mindset changed for me yesterday when I read Lucas Mearian’s article in ComputerWorld, Layoffs leave behind orphaned hardware, unused software licenses.

This article highlights the challenges associated with corporate layoffs and the PCs that are left behind. Lucas writes about the countless PCs, servers and handheld devices lying around – some with sensitive data. Thankfully, some of these are being properly recycled… but others are gathering dust or being sold on eBay. All that precious data you worked to collect could now be sold to the highest, nearly-anonymous bidder.

If you’re overseeing data use/ security, keep the following points in mind:
1) Limit/ keep reign over customer information, don’t let copies float around unnecessarily.

2) If information is shared (internally,) make sure that only the minimum is offered. Explain the concerns to your team/ co-workers odds are they’ll understand.

3) Audit vendors/ partners to make sure they are taking precautions with your data. As related questions shoul


We’ve blogged in the past about the importance of data security… and like most, I typically think this is a straight-forward concept – one person protecting THEIR PC, mobile etc. That mindset changed for me yesterday when I read Lucas Mearian’s article in ComputerWorld, Layoffs leave behind orphaned hardware, unused software licenses.

This article highlights the challenges associated with corporate layoffs and the PCs that are left behind. Lucas writes about the countless PCs, servers and handheld devices lying around – some with sensitive data. Thankfully, some of these are being properly recycled… but others are gathering dust or being sold on eBay. All that precious data you worked to collect could now be sold to the highest, nearly-anonymous bidder.

If you’re overseeing data use/ security, keep the following points in mind:
1) Limit/ keep reign over customer information, don’t let copies float around unnecessarily.

2) If information is shared (internally,) make sure that only the minimum is offered. Explain the concerns to your team/ co-workers odds are they’ll understand.

3) Audit vendors/ partners to make sure they are taking precautions with your data. As related questions should your vendor has turn over (i.e. your account manager.)
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