How to Implement BPM in Your Organization

August 3, 2015
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Business Process Management, or BPM, can be a fairly broad term. It encompasses a whole set of tools and techniques that enhance how you run your business, no matter what that business may be. Using BPM, those who run a business can better serve the customer and meet the organization’s goals. One secret of BPM’s success is that it does not just apply to management or to regular employees or to a particular department. The best kind of BPM is a company-wide implementation.

Business Process Management, or BPM, can be a fairly broad term. It encompasses a whole set of tools and techniques that enhance how you run your business, no matter what that business may be. Using BPM, those who run a business can better serve the customer and meet the organization’s goals. One secret of BPM’s success is that it does not just apply to management or to regular employees or to a particular department. The best kind of BPM is a company-wide implementation.

BPM is not a new thing. The very creation of departments and the allocation of tasks are early forms of these techniques that are still widely used today. The development of software to streamline business practices has led to a great boom in BPM and the creation of tools specifically designed to make your organization run smoother than ever before. These tools allow you to get an overview of your processes so you can improve, analyze, or even reconstruct how you do business with unprecedented ease.

  • Find the BPM method that’s right for your organization. There is a plethora of BPM applications and materials out there today, and not all of them are going to apply to your particular business. Once you find the one that fits, you’ll need to stay with it for a while; the benefits won’t appear overnight.
  • Consider using professionals. Especially if it’s your first time, a professional team can help you implement your new BPM and get lines of communication flowing between everyone involved. Once you understand the processes, you can drop the consultants, only using them for when you’ve got a critical problem that needs more experience than you currently have.
  • Train your management team. Your managers should always be up-to-date when it comes to your BPM program. Not only should they know how to use it to its greatest capacity, but they should also know the reasons for its implementation. Consider having training workshops prior to the rollout of your BPM.
  • Train everyone else. There are many, many different types of BPM, suited for service businesses or manufacturers or whatever combination you might acquire. When you choose a new management program for better efficiency and to better serve your customers, it becomes pointless when your customer service team and those that work directly with your clientele don’t understand their part in your new BPM program.
  • Prepare, prepare, prepare.  Implementation of BPM will take time, money, and technology. Be sure you have enough of all of these to spare. As part of this, and an adjunct to training, plan to acquire documentation and time for your team to read it. Even if this isn’t your first iteration of BPM, documentation is absolutely necessary, because of changes that may have occurred.
  • Assess and clarify your goals. There is a reason you’re getting BPM. Make sure everyone knows why in clear and certain terms. Your organization has goals and a purpose, and so should your implementation of BPM. It isn’t enough just to have a goal, however. Detail your strategy for getting there through the vehicle of BPM as well. If everyone knows where they’re going, it will be far easier for you to get there.
  • Prioritize your projects. One of the major reasons to implement BPM is to determine what is working and what is not. Put more focus on those aspects of your business that really work well, and should you find something that isn’t working well at all, cut it out entirely.
  • Avoid “scope creep.” When you have your goals, stick to them. One of the worst things you can do is to lay down a process, then keep adding to it. Even if it’s going very, very well, wait until your goal is achieved before you change the goal post or add more to the processes already laid out.
  • Develop an incentive plan. Rewards and recognition are a great way to get everyone on board with any new program, BPM included. If anyone comes up with a good idea to make things go more smoothly or to enhance the process, they should be rewarded for it. Those who help you make significant progress toward your goals should be recognized. When one of your team members gets a glowing review from a customer, that means good word of mouth for your organization. Reward it.

Once you’ve launched your BPM program, the work isn’t done. You may have implemented your BPM software, but like any other aspect of your organization, it’s not a static thing. Your customer base will change, their expectations will change, and you and your BPM should be able to change accordingly. The ability to change will always keep you at least one step ahead of your competition.