Comments I Read: Jeremy Pickens

February 7, 2009
168 Views

Jeremy Pickens doesn’t have a blog–as far as the blogosphere goes, he is homeless. Or rather, he likes to hang out at my house–which is great, because he’s the kind of guest who brings over good wine and then helps you with the cooking. He is by far the most active contributor to the comment threads here at The Noisy Channel. If you are reading this blog through an RSS reader and skipping the comments, here is a taste of what you’ve been missing:

I met Jeremy a few years ago–at RIAO 2007 in Pittsburgh if I recall correctly. He co-authored a paper on “Collaborative Exploratory Search” presented at the inaugural HCIR workshop that same year.

As his home page at FXPAL tells us:

Jeremy’s major research themes, since joining FXPAL in 2005, include Music Information Retrieval, Video Information Retrieval and Collaborative Exploratory Search (Collaborative Information Seeking). He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst at the Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval (CIIR). Jeremy did his post-doc

Jeremy Pickens doesn’t have a blog–as far as the blogosphere goes, he is homeless. Or rather, he likes to hang out at my house–which is great, because he’s the kind of guest who brings over good wine and then helps you with the cooking. He is by far the most active contributor to the comment threads here at The Noisy Channel. If you are reading this blog through an RSS reader and skipping the comments, here is a taste of what you’ve been missing:

I met Jeremy a few years ago–at RIAO 2007 in Pittsburgh if I recall correctly. He co-authored a paper on “Collaborative Exploratory Search” presented at the inaugural HCIR workshop that same year.

As his home page at FXPAL tells us:

Jeremy’s major research themes, since joining FXPAL in 2005, include Music Information Retrieval, Video Information Retrieval and Collaborative Exploratory Search (Collaborative Information Seeking). He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst at the Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval (CIIR). Jeremy did his post-doctoral work at King’s College in London from 2004-2005.

Jeremy is too modest to claim credit for his outsize contributions to this blog, so I thought I’d break convention and allow his collective comments to qualify as a “blog I read”.  They are certainly worth reading. and I hope he keeps contributing once he does have a blog of its own–which is inevitable.

Link to original post