On College Porn and Money, the Policy Way

April 22, 2009
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Responding to my blog interview two weeks ago with adult entertainer Stoya on how she uses social media, several people added heated comments that pornography was unjust and immoral.
I have a question for them–and for you.
Which is the greater evil: the First Amendment right of a taxpayer-funded university to screen a pornographic film on campus, […]


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The pirates are backResponding to my blog interview two weeks ago with adult entertainer Stoya on how she uses social media, several people added heated comments that pornography was unjust and immoral.

I have a question for them–and for you.

Which is the greater evil: the First Amendment right of a taxpayer-funded university to screen a pornographic film on campus, or the legislative right of a state senator to threaten denial of $424 million to fund campus building projects unless the university sets a policy for pornography on campus?

Click that link and be brought to an April 7 story in the Washington Post about how a coalition of student leaders intended to follow the lead of Carnegie Mellon University, UCLA, and other higher education institutions to screen “Pirates II: Stagnetti’s Revenge.”

After state Senator Andrew Harris “called on the university administration to assert its authority,” the full-length film wasn’t shown, despite a post-film Planned Parenthood talk on safe sex; but selections were, followed by a 200-student lecture on free speech. CNN elaborates:

Should a college promote an “analytical discussion of sexuality and exploitation,” as Slate’s Samantha Henig opines? Or is a pornographic teach-in the best recourse?

Maybe I’m not the best person to argue with a Maryland senator who believes pornography is more addictive than tobacco.

But when you consider my late-college years included opposing the constitutionality of the Communications Decency Act through email activism with the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s listserv–which the U.S. Supreme Court agreed was illegal–I’m siding with the university here and the backdrop of the U.S. Bill of Rights. You?


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