Consumer Data Empowerment

October 20, 2008
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In the world of database marketing, everything counts! Each open, click, the in-store behaviors and all the browse history on your website counts toward the marketing intelligence used to segment and build customer models.

Let’s assume four people walk into your store; the first guy (we’ll call Bob) explores the aisles but walks out without purchasing anything. On his way out he picks up a brochure, at home he completes the insert card for a cont


In the world of database marketing, everything counts! Each open, click, the in-store behaviors and all the browse history on your website counts toward the marketing intelligence used to segment and build customer models.

Let’s assume four people walk into your store; the first guy (we’ll call Bob) explores the aisles but walks out without purchasing anything. On his way out he picks up a brochure, at home he completes the insert card for a contest and subscribes to receive mailed promotions.

Jill walks into the store, selects a gift for a friend. At check out she is offered a $5 off coupon in exchange for some basic information – name, address and two demographic questions.

John makes a purchase and only provides his phone number to the cashier, he pays by credit card.

Suzy rushes in, picks up flowers and chewing gum refusing to provide any contact information and paying cash. At home she visits the website listed on the receipt and signs up for email.

Data of all of these transactions are compiled into profiles for each person; let’s assume ten fields of data along with the number of subsequent interactions from each person. At the end of the quarter, Bob has visited the store once again and makes a purchase. Jill came back to redeem her coupon and on three additional occasions. John came in twice more but Suzy never came to the store again, instead she has been interacting online. Suzy has received 25 email campaigns, opened 12 of them, clicked on 19 different links and made one purchase.

Traditional systems often overlook (or aren’t equipped) for multi-channel interaction… in our example; Suzy would be put in the same category as Bob – one-time buyers, because they each made one in-store purchase. As you can see this simple amount of data is quickly skewed, now imagine what happens with all of the interactions, across all locations and channels over the course of the year. Compile this with your supplier and inventory data and your database will either crawl to a conclusion or freeze.

We have the opportunity to participate in a conference this week focused on the most powerful database management solution available – to learn how other companies have taken their simple data to make complex decisions while successfully building relationships with their consumers and plotting their business growth.

If you’re also attending the Teradata Partners event, visit us in Booth 407 and make plans to attend my Seven eAbsolutes presentation tomorrow at 4:30 in Mandalay Bay L. You can also read more about this year’s event on Darryl McDonald’s Blog.
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