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On How Big Data Benefits Businesses

If you can, please share some of those impacts. You went on to mention technologies, but not *how* Big Data is being used. Gartner maintains a library of 100s of real-world high-value examples. Happy to include any of your's or others' --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

 

June 23, 2015    View Comment    

On How Big Data Benefits Businesses

Good piece Anand. Great to see others catching on to Gartner's 3Vs of big data that we first posited over a decade and a half ago. (Though we always appreciate the professional courtesy of a citation.) For reference, here is my piece from 2001 defining them: http://goo.gl/wH3qG. --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney
June 23, 2015    View Comment    

On Safe Big Data

Great piece. And great to see others catching on to Gartner's "V"s of Big Data, albeit 15 years after we first published them (and without the professional courtesy of a citation). Also, note that veracity is not a common Big Data challenge or definitional characteristic of Big Data. Rather it is an aspirational characteristic. And, vercity tends to be much higher in Big Data -- since it is automatically captured -- than in traditional sources. --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

June 1, 2015    View Comment    

On Data = Opportunity: But Are You Monetizing Information?

Again, a clarification, "half the Gartner clients **I** speak with."  Our 1000 other analysts speak with clients on other topics. --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

May 28, 2015    View Comment    

On Data = Opportunity: But Are You Monetizing Information?

Also, Gartner has a library of 100s of examples on how organizations are monetising their data in innovative ways -- from generating measurable economic benefits, to outright bartering or selling their data. I present on these at Gartner events. --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

May 28, 2015    View Comment    

On Data = Opportunity: But Are You Monetizing Information?

Great piece RK. Thanks for the mentions. But just to clarify, I did not come up with the term "big data", just the "3Vs" definition. Big Data was a term used by CGI chief scientist John Mashey in the mid-90s.


Couldn't agree more about the importance and interest in this topic. As an analyst with Gartner, nearly half of the client interactions lately about 1) valuing data as a corporate asset, or 2) monetizing data better (including selling it). We are putting a lot of research effort into these topics now, and are a few weeks away from publishing our information valuation models.

Cheers,

--Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

May 28, 2015    View Comment    

On Big Data Buzz or Big Data Fuzz?

Thanks for recognizing Gartner's thought leadership on this topic, Ben. In fact the 3Vs definition dates back to the late 90's at META Group (now Gartner) and a piece I wrote in 2001: (ref: http://goo.gl/wH3qG). It has been pretty clear since then and Mark Beyer and I at Gartner reclarified it a couple years ago in our "Big Data: A Definition" piece. We at Gartner shy away from using it as a buzzword and keep to our clear definition.

Also note that the term "Big Data" seems to originate with Silicon Graphics engineer John Mashey around the mid-90s', in a presentation he was giving on "Big Data and the Next Wave of Infrastress" (that you can still find on the interwebs somewhere).

Cheers,
Doug

--Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

 

April 16, 2015    View Comment    

On Big Data Is Really Dead

Something with 125% growth is "dead"?  Seriously?  This anonymous article isn't worthy of comment, but as the creator of the 3Vs a decade and a half ago I'll happily address Daniel's question:

Yes, Gartner has identified and published on a dozen different qualities of data including those you mention. But only velocity, volume and variety are definitional characteristics of big data. Only these three V's are characteristics of magnitute, i.e. "biggness". Others over the years have "cleverly" (?) added other Vs to my original framework (perhaps to avoid crediting Gartner with it?), unwittingly confounding the concept of magnitude.

For my original piece on the 3Vs from 14 years ago, see http://goo.gl/wH3qG. For a humorous perspective on what Batman and others think of additional "V"s, see: http://blogs.gartner.com/doug-laney/batman-on-big-data/.

--Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney 

April 6, 2015    View Comment    

On The Biggest Contradiction of Big Data

Oh, and it's great to see others catching on to Gartner's "3Vs" of Big Data, that we first introduced over 15 years ago (albeit most often without the professional courtesy of a citation). To see the original piece I wrote back then: http://goo.gl/wH3qG.

Cheers, Doug

March 23, 2015    View Comment    

On The Biggest Contradiction of Big Data

Hi Martyn,

At Gartner, I have compiled a library of several hundred real-world Big Data related examples from organizations in every industry--most with quantified business benefits. I continue to add strories each week. Gartner clients can request a sample of these use cases related to their business, or any type of data (e.g. social media, IoT, etc.)  or business function (e.g., finance, marketing, etc.) they're interested in by submitting a "written request inquiry" via [email protected] or their Gartner rep. I'll be presenting dozens of them at our BI Summit in Vegas next week.

--Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney

March 23, 2015    View Comment    

On Big Data and Data Science: Is This Hype?

Daniel, Thank you for recognizing Gartner's/my original 3Vs from over 12yrs ago. For future reference, you and your readers might like to see the my 2001 piece first positing them:Three Dimensional Data Challenges. However, I'm confused why you suggest there should be objective indicators for each dimension. Just to keep people from "abusing" the "big data" term? Who really cares? It's both a relative and moving target: I.e. one organization's big data is another organization's not-so-big data. And next year, this year's big data may not seem so big. Gartner's updated definition recognizes this in suggesting that you have big data when "...new innovative forms of processing" are required.  That's all that really matters--when your current infrastructure components can no longer handle a jump in your data's volume, velocity and/or variety. Otherwise, I totally agree that big data has just entered it's golden run. Cheers, Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney 

September 23, 2013    View Comment    

On How Data Hoarding Is Costing Your Business

Great piece Ephriam! Assessing which information is qualitatively deemed "important" is just the beginning however. Gartner is working with clients to quantify the actual *economic value* of their information assets using models we have developed as part of our infonomics research. We gauge the gap between retention costs, realized value and probable future economic benefits to make well-informed retention, management and usage decisions. Similarly, thought leaders at IBM incl Deidre Paknad are proponents of "defensible disposal" using quantified methods to determine information retention. For more on infonomics, including links to articles and research: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infonomics.  --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney 

September 20, 2013    View Comment